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Spaying a female

 

We recommend having a female cat spayed before she reaches sexual maturity at 5 to 6 months of age. Once sexual maturity is reached, the cat will begin to come into season or 'call'. Cycles of sexual activity typically occur every three weeks. Having your cat spayed will not only eliminate unplanned pregnancies but will also prevent diseases associated with the genital tract later in life.

 

We recommend that your cat comes in for a complimentary pre-neuter check up with one of our veterinary nurses prior to her spay operation to check that she is in good health and ready to have her operation.

 

The operation involves the administration of a general anaesthetic and the surgical removal of the ovaries and uterus through an incision made on the flank or belly of the cat. The fur at the site of the incision will have to be shaved.

 

She will be admitted early in the morning of her operation and will stay with us for the day.  She will be able to return home later on the same day and advise that she is kept quiet.  The skin sutures are generally removed after 7 to 10 days.

 

Castrating a male

 

Castrating a male is as equally important as spaying a female to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Furthermore, entire male cats have a strong tendency to roam, to be aggressive to other males, to fight and to mark their territory by spraying urine (often indoors!). The aggressive behaviour puts an uncastrated male at much higher risk of serious infectious disease such as feline immunodeficiency virus (feline 'AIDS') and feline leukaemia virus, both of which are transmitted through cat bites.

 

We recommend that your cat comes in for a complimentary pre-neuter check up with one of our veterinary nurses prior to castration to check that he is in good health and ready to have his operation.  

 

Castration involves removing both testes under general anaesthetic through small incisions into the scrotum. Usually the skin incisions for a castration are so small that sutures are not required.

 

He will be admitted early in the morning of his operation and will stay with us for the day.  He will be able to return home later on the same day and we advise that he is kept quiet.

 

Will my cat have different needs once it has been neutered?

 

Once your cat has been neutered there is a stronger tendency for him/her to become overweight and so you will need to adjust the amount of food you provide.  We recommend feeding a 'neutered cat' diet designed to meet the different nutritional requirements of a neutered cat. One of our vets or nurses will be only too happy to give advice.

Neutering